Zene Dade - Nišville Jazz Festival
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DADA’S WOMEN –THEATRE INSTALLATION- ONE IMAGINARY EXHIBITION

2016/2017 marks the centenary of the DADA Movement –anti-war, avant-garde art movement. Artists around the world are paying homage to this important cultural movement through a variety of exhibitions, performances, installations, and interactive educational events. Yet, the female artists who played a vital role in the DADA Movement have been severely underrepresented in these celebrations, and have largely been left-out of the popular history of Dadaism in general. Emerging in the wake of the WWI, the DADA Movement was initiated by a creative critical mass of artists seeking to expose and explode the oppressive political and societal structures of the day. Our present moment shares many similarities with that historical moment a century ago: worldwide conflict, violence and injustice, a staggering migrant crisis, horrifying economic inequality, and overwhelming global poverty. As an artistic movement predicated on new ways to oppose war and violence and motivate social change, Dadaism still speaks to us. In today’s political climate, artists must continue to find ways of creative engagement that resist the political, social, and cultural systems of violence, misogyny, war, and economic injustice. The primary rule of Dadaism was that there were no rules. Liberated from aesthetic

The primary rule of Dadaism was that there were no rules. Liberated from aesthetic and cultural limitations,this courageous and innovative“anti-agenda” allowed the movement to spread in all directions. Yet, perhaps this same refusal to articulate a defined platform also prevented Dadaism from recognizing and addressing patriarchy’s inherent broader inequalities.Even while women artists fully participated in Dadaism’s creative resistance along-side their male colleagues, pioneering certain artistic concepts that remain with us today, women’s unique contributions to the DADA Movement have not been fully recognized. Their absence is a glaring omission in the historical record.

To truly understand Dadaism and how that unique form of creative resistance still beckons us today, it is crucial to shed light on the important role that women played in the DADA Movement, and to celebrate the broader egalitarian potential of Dadaism at large.

Dijana Milosevic

Direction and concept: DijanaMilošević

Actors: Evgenija Eškina Kovačević , Aleksandra Jelić, Ivana Milenović Popović,

Ivana Milovanović, Ivan Nikolić

Musicians: Nemanja Ajdačić, UglješaMajdevac

Set design: Neša Paripović

Costume design and make-up: Snežana Arnautović i DAH Teatar

Ready-made suitcases: Evgenija Eškina Kovačević , Aleksandra Jelić, Ivana

Milenović Popović, Ivana Milovanović, Ivan Nikolić

Light design: Milomir Dimitrijević

Organization and PR: Nataša Novaković

Photography: Una Škandro

Special thanks to: Kulturni centar Beograda, Snežana Arnautović, Christina Morus,

Neša Paripović and Shira Wolfe.